N2 GALERÍA
Barcelona, Spain
November 17, 2011 – January 9, 2012

Cosmovisión Andina y los hijos del Inti” (“Andean Cosmovision and the Inti’s sons”) is an approach to the ancient cultures of the Peruvian coast and the Andean plateau full of color, wisdom and mysticism. In this exhibit, I used my pictorial language is used to reinvent a new idea of ancestral reconnection. In this accelerated chaotic world, many of us have lost our connection with Mother Nature. Every day we become more wrapped up in this digital society surround by concrete. It is important to realize that we live in a society that has been led astray, following trivial causes it has “regressed”. These paradigms are becoming obsolete, and ancestral reconnection and attachment to ancient cultures are emerging as a new way of thought. As I learned more about and became more interested in the Andean cultures, the pre-Hispanic and pre-Inca periods gave me the opportunity to meet different inhabitants of the Tiahuanaco, Chimu, Paracas, Moche, Chachapoyas and Incan cultures and learn about the great skills they held in various disciplines.

Moche pottery, considered to be some of the most beautiful in Peruvian culture are characterized by elegant shapes and decorations. Left as offerings for the dead, they are full of life and movement incorporating humans, gods, animals, plants, and complex scenes of ceremonies and mystical rituals. Similarly, the Paracas culture, world-renowned for its famous mantos (robes or tunics) and large extraordinary colorful textiles, containing more than one hundred and eighty different shades including strands of human hair. Likewise, their delicate translucent gauzes were exquisitely decorated. These different ancestral cultures had so many artistic and cultural achievements that is difficult to show an example of each one in an exhibition.

This is an exhibition in which you can see in different media and materials, characters from different periods such as the paintings which represent different Incan, Chaski, Mochica and Hombre Cóndor figures. Shamanic rituals can be found within a cosmic table, and ancient structures that are represented in a large painting titlled Psicodelia Andina. Myths and legends such as the Amaru Muru dimensional door in Puno, Peru. Idol sculptures inspired by the sun and the moon. Abstractions on paper of Quipus, a system using knotted ropes of different colors, used as an accounting system in the ancient empires and may also have been a way of writing, and a large double sided tapestry.